AMNIOTIC MEMBRANE ALLOGRAFT

What is an Amniotic Membrane Allograft Injection?

Amniotic membrane allograft (AMA) injections are composed of dehydrated placental tissue. AMA is used to treat acute (new) and chronic (old) muscle, tendon, bone and joint conditions. AMA treatments can help these areas heal, by assisting healing of damaged tissue and in some cases, the development of new tissue. These injections are often performed by Dr. Burns using ultrasound-guidance, to ensure accuracy of treatment and to maximize the results.

What is the Science?

Amniotic membrane tissue has been shown to have active growth factors, including, transforming growth factor–b (TGF-b), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor–a (TGF-a), keratinocyte growth factor, and hepatocyte growth factor. In addition, amniotic membrane have been shown to be a source for pluripotent (stem) cells (Riboh et al.).  AMA injections may assist in the migration of a patient's own stem cells, further assisting the healing process. For these reasons, amniotic membrane is thought to be a powerful tool within regenerative medicine.

How are the injections performed?

Each injection is performed in an outpatient, office setting. Dr. Burns often uses ultrasound-guidance for the injections, to ensure injection accuracy.

Amniotic Membrane injections can be combined with Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) injection in some cases.

What conditions are treated?

  • Rotator cuff damage

  • Tennis elbow

  • Golfers elbow

  • Jumpers Knee

  • Joint pain

  • Arthritis

  • Many others

Amniotic Membrane Allograft Video

Riboh, Jonathan C., et al. "Human Amniotic Membrane–Derived Products in Sports Medicine: Basic Science, Early Results, and Potential Clinical Applications." The American journal of sports medicine 44.9 (2016): 2425-2434.

Gellhorn, Alfred C., and Alex Han. "The Use of Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane Allograft Injection for the Treatment of Tendinopathy or Arthritis: A Case Series Involving 40 Patients." PM&R 9.12 (2017): 1236-1243.